A forum for owners of the Siberian Husky.
 
HomeFAQSearchRegisterRegisterLog in
Congratulations Sierra and Jen B!, our December HOTM winners! HOTM - January : TBA!
Husky of the Month
Congrats Sierra and Jen B,
our December HOTM Winners!
Winter Fun!





Thanks to all for this month's entries!
Forum Rules
1. Here we prefer clarity to agreement. Obviously not everyone is going to agree on a topic; here we prefer to talk out our differences in a respectful manner to ensure mutual understanding and respect.
2. Read the Stickies and Announcements. Each sub-forum may have specific rules which trump the Forum Rules in cases where there may be conflicting information. Read the rules of each board before you post so that you are clear on the expectations of the staff.
3. Respect ALL Staff and Admins. These people volunteer of their time and MUST be respected as well as their word adhered to. They are responsible for maintaining a free, open, clear and organized forum. Anyone found to be openly undermining any official ruling by a staff member will be warned.
4. Signatures: One picture only and no links. Images: To keep the forum looking neat and tidy, we ask that members insert just one picture only in their signatures. The picture should be no more than 200x500 pixels and should be of an appropriate subject, for example, your dogs and their names. Should you need assistance creating an appropriate signature, please PM an Admin and we would be happy to help! This is to ensure that signatures remain a welcome addition to our forum instead of a cumbersome distraction. Links: Hyperlinks in signatures--unless to a personal blog or photo stream of your dogs (like Flckr or Piscasa, for example)--are strictly prohibited. Please PM a staff member with any questions or concerns regarding this rule.
Rescue Spotlight
Our current rescue spotlight is:

Texas Sled Dog Rescue!

Top Dog Website Award Winner!

Top Website
for
Siberian

Huskys


Share | .
 

 Safe lawn products

View previous topic View next topic Go down 
AuthorMessage
blueeyedghost
Maverick
avatar

Female Join date : 2011-07-01
Location : Denver, CO

PostSubject: Safe lawn products   Sun Apr 13, 2014 6:08 pm

Anyone have any recommendations on lawn care products that aren't just a bunch of toxic chemicals? We have to be really careful around Shadow (and I don't really want the other two exposed either), but our lawn looks like crap right now.

_________________
Shadow's Blog

Canine Hydrocephalus Support on Facebook

"Being the parent of a special-needs pet means living your life constantly poised on the edge of a double-edged sword. On the one hand, you become a fierce defender of the ways in which your little one is perfectly ordinary — all the things he or she can do that are just like what everybody else does. And yet, you never lose sight of how absolutely extraordinary that very ordinariness is, how difficult, remarkable and rewarding that fight to be 'just like everybody else' has been."  -Gwen Cooper, "Homer's Odyssey"

Shadow - 03/01/2013 - 10/02/2014

Back to top Go down
amymeme
Senior
Senior
avatar

Female Join date : 2013-12-20

PostSubject: Re: Safe lawn products   Sun Apr 13, 2014 7:11 pm

yup you have to be careful - I just put peat moss on one of my vegetable beds and stupid dog started eating it!

What kind of "look like crap" is it - weeds, thin, pale, lots of white patches (aka snow mold)...
Back to top Go down
Eresh
Adult
Adult
avatar

Female Join date : 2012-10-06
Location : Space Coast, Florida

PostSubject: Re: Safe lawn products   Sun Apr 13, 2014 8:17 pm

I'm scared to use anything on the lawn. I swear my dogs are part goat and love to pull the grass out by its roots. I discovered that I can kill fire ants by pouring a very large amount of boiling water on the ant hill.
Back to top Go down
blueeyedghost
Maverick
avatar

Female Join date : 2011-07-01
Location : Denver, CO

PostSubject: Re: Safe lawn products   Mon Apr 14, 2014 12:14 am

We have a ton of weeds and dead spots. We don't want a pro golf course quality lawn, but we do want it looking decent.

_________________
Shadow's Blog

Canine Hydrocephalus Support on Facebook

"Being the parent of a special-needs pet means living your life constantly poised on the edge of a double-edged sword. On the one hand, you become a fierce defender of the ways in which your little one is perfectly ordinary — all the things he or she can do that are just like what everybody else does. And yet, you never lose sight of how absolutely extraordinary that very ordinariness is, how difficult, remarkable and rewarding that fight to be 'just like everybody else' has been."  -Gwen Cooper, "Homer's Odyssey"

Shadow - 03/01/2013 - 10/02/2014

Back to top Go down
capellalayla
Senior
Senior
avatar

Female Join date : 2013-09-24
Location : Billerica, Mass.

PostSubject: Re: Safe lawn products   Mon Apr 14, 2014 9:37 am

We had the same issue last year when we first bought the house. The front lawn, as we found out, has a grub problem that had caused dead spots and a huge infestation of mouse-ear chickweed. If you don't know what that is, Google it and you'll see how invasive and fast-spreading it is. At one point it covered about a quarter of our lawn. I don't much care what the back yard looks like, long as there's a little grass, but since that's where the dogs will play and it's not easily seen by people walking by then it's not a huge concern if there are holes and dead spots, but the front yard's appearance does matter to me, something my husband will probably never understand.  Rolling Eyes 

For grubs I'd suggest introducing nematodes to your lawn. They're living organisms that eat grubs. It may take a few years to fully get rid of the grub problem but I've heard positive things about it.

If there are any organic landscapers around you, maybe they would have some tips on nontoxic solutions for fertilizing? I'll probably use Bayer's season-long grub killer next month and Scotts fertilizer this week, but only on the front lawn, where Layla doesn't really go. Once those products are watered into the soil, it should be safe.
Back to top Go down
amymeme
Senior
Senior
avatar

Female Join date : 2013-12-20

PostSubject: Re: Safe lawn products   Mon Apr 14, 2014 9:56 am

If you want to kill the weeds I would stay away from any of the commercial lawn care products - most herbicides can be quite toxic.  If you wanted - Roundup would be relatively safe though I would apply it several hours before a rain and then keep the dogs off until after the rain.  here's a link re: glyphospate safety:  http://pmep.cce.cornell.edu/profiles/extoxnet/dienochlor-glyphosate/glyphosate-ext.html

Note that the surfactant may be more of a problem then the glyphosate itself.  I don't know if the Rodeo formulation for use in aquatic situations might work on weeds though you might consider that.  Discussion re surfactant for glyphosate:  http://www.hort.uconn.edu/cipwg/art_pubs/GUIDE/consideration.htm

Another weed control possibility is a propane torch weeder (depending on how large a lawn you need to renovate.
This one uses a large propane cylinder:http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200584783_200584783?cm_mmc=Google-pla-_-Snow%20%2B%20Ice%20Removal-_-Torch%20Kits-_-29193&ci_src=17588969&ci_sku=29193&gclid=CLTDpoj3370CFQ5gMgodYk0AqQ
There are others that use a little 1 pounder throw away:  http://www.amazon.com/NICKEL-PLATED-BRASS-STEEL-GARDEN/dp/B008CF8AN4/ref=zg_bs_3480723011_6

Me - I leave the weeds, they stay green in the heat of the summer (I don't know if Maryland is considered northern grass - dormant in summer or southern grass - dormant in winter - whenever its dormant, its brown.)  We also have under-seeded our grass with dutch white clover - its low growing, takes mowing well and stays green all the time.  Also bird's foot trefoil - it's the little yellow flowers by the roadsides in mid-late summer.  With mowing the bird's foot has a tight mat of tiny green leaves.  We leave the dandelions alone - our lawns are full of them and it is a very cheery sight in early May.  And very amusing to listen to husband growl and gnash his teeth over all the little fluff balls and stems that lay down for the mower and pop up the next day to make everything look unkempt Laughing Besides, the dandelions are good fodder for bees when there is little else available.  I do shoot the plantain with glyphosate - stuff has dull green grass killing mat with sticky looking stalks, don't like it.  Also, a monoculture of just lawn grass is much more vulnerable to diseases - I call ours an "herbal" lawn.  Euphemism, I know.

As for seeding and feeding...for existing grass, provided your lawn is not too extensive, you might try a liquid foliar feed - like miracle grow, peter's or Jack's.  mix up a concentrate, use a hose spray attachment.  Don't let dogs on the grass until its dry or even better, time the application for several hours before a rain on a warmish (above 50° F) day, let it rain then dry and then let the dogs out.  Or, what you really want is just a source of nitrogen for greening - alfalfa, cotton seed or blood meals all are good sources of nitrogen BUT costly (you can always get alfalfa rabbit pellets and throw them around but I'll bet the pups will chow down - maybe water it in to dissolve them.)

Another fertilizer possibiltiy with low toxicity is Milorganite.  It stinks.  I use it in spring, summer and fall surrounding my vegetable garden and daylilly planting to keep the deer away (works well for that PROVIDED there is other forage available, which in winter, there is not.)  Info re pets and children:  http://www.milorganite.com/en/Lawn-Care/Using-Milorganite-on-Lawns/Children-and-Pets.aspx

For seeding bare patches:  Choose appropriate grass (sunny, shady, high traffic etc., look for high proportion of perrenial grasses - annual rye grass will die over the winter but give you quick grass this season)  Loosen the soil surface for an inch or 2, sprinkle on your seed (I strongly recommend mixing in some dutch white clover), rake into the soil, cover with straw (messy looking but highly effective) or compost (though, I'll bet the doggies will munch on that, too).  The key to lawn establishment is keeping the seed moist which, depending on the weather, can mean light watering several times a day.  There are lawn patch mixes that have green colored mulch incorporated but again, even though it might not be toxic, I'm pretty certain an inquisative, munchy dog would nibble and then you'd have to re-seed.  Once the seed is germinated, for the first week or two, continue at least twice daily watering.  After that, reduce to once daily for several weeks and gradually reduce to a few times weekly - just monitor it.  If your soil pH is wildly off neutral, you may want to correct that...we have highly acid soil and doesn't seem to matter.  

Mow high - 3 inches is good for plant growth (husband doesn't - says it looks shaggy and has to be mowed too often) and encourages deep roots.  Helpful in times of drought.

Did not mean for this to be a treatise but...it is what it is, I'm wordy lol! 

Good luck with your lawn (and I'll have to follow my own advice - when hubby sees what Ami has done to the lawn where is trolley is...)

Just saw Liz's post - nematodes are good - to check for grubs, try pulling up a patch of grass, if it lifts easily (ie roots have been chewed off, then you have grubs. Or lift a shovel full in a couple of places - you should see 2 or 3 grubs per shovel full. Also, moles are indicative of grub problem)
Back to top Go down
Sponsored content




PostSubject: Re: Safe lawn products   

Back to top Go down
 

Safe lawn products

View previous topic View next topic Back to top 
Page 1 of 1

 Similar topics

-
» Does fresh chicken manure burn lawn grass?
» Safe soaker hose?
» It's Me AGAIN! - Looking for a garden safe wood sealer
» How long do pickles keep? Are these safe?
» Safe and secure? Mulching with paper?

Permissions in this forum:You cannot reply to topics in this forum
It's a Husky Thing - Siberian Husky Forum :: Advice and Discussion Forums :: The Great Outdoors-